Print  |  Send  |   

Copper nanowires to replace ITO on mobile displays

October 03, 2011 // Julien Happich

Copper nanowires to replace ITO on mobile displays

Nanowires of copper could eliminate busted cell phone screens and make solar cells more competitive with fossil fuels. These new nanostructures have the potential to drive down the costs of displaying information on cell phones, e-readers and tablets, and they could also help engineers build foldable electronics and improved solar cells, according to new research.


Page 1 of 2

Duke chemist Ben Wiley and his graduate student have developed a technique to organize copper atoms in water to form long, thin, non-clumped nanowires. The nanowires are then transformed into transparent, conductive films and coated onto glass or plastic. The new research shows that the copper nanowire films have the same properties as those currently used in electronic devices and solar cells, but are less expensive to manufacture. The films that currently connect pixels in electronic screens are made of indium tin oxide, or ITO. It is highly transparent, which transmits the information well. But the ITO film must be deposited from a vapour in a process that is a thousand times slower than newspaper printing, and, once the ITO is in the device, it cracks easily. Indium is also an expensive rare earth element, costing as much as $800 per kilogram.

A new flexible film made of copper nanowires and plastic conducts electricity illuminating a small light bulb. Credit: Ben Wiley, Duke University.
These problems have driven worldwide efforts to find less expensive materials that can be coated or printed like ink at much faster speeds to make low-cost, transparent conducting films, Wiley said. One alternative to an ITO film is to use inks containing silver nanowires. The first cell phone with a screen made from silver nanowires will be on the market this year. But silver, like indium, is still relatively expensive at $1400 per kilogram. Copper, on the other hand, is a thousand times more abundant than indium or silver, and about 100 times less expensive, costing only $9 per kilogram.
1 | 2 | Next page

All news

Displays & Interfaces,Optoelectronics

Follow us

Fast, Accurate & Relevant for Design Engineers only!

Technical papers     

Linear video channel

READER OFFER

Read more

This month, Arrow Electronics is giving away ten BeMicro Max 10 FPGA evaluation boards together with an integrated USB-Blaster, each package being worth 90 Euros, for EETimes Europe's readers to win.

Designed to get you started with using an FPGA, the BeMicro Max 10 adopts Altera's non-volatile MAX 10 FPGA built on 55-nm flash process.

The MAX 10 FPGAs are claimed to revolutionize...

MORE INFO AND LAST MONTH' WINNERS...

Design centers     

Automotive
Infotainment Making HDTV in the car reliable and secure

December 15, 2011 | Texas instruments | 222901974

Unique Ser/Des technology supports encrypted video and audio content with full duplex bi-directional control channel over a single wire interface.

 

You must be logged in to view this page

Login here :