2.5GS/s high definition oscilloscope equipped with true 12-bit ADC

October 22, 2012 // By Julien Happich
Teledyne LeCroy's HDO4000 and HDO6000 high definition oscilloscopes are the company’s first instruments to operate with the so-called HD4096 high definition technology (4096 levels of quantization thanks to a 12-bit ADC).

Designed with a new SiGe front-end and a new hardware platform to improve signal to noise ratio, especially by further eliminating noise from the power supply, the instruments acquire waveforms that are cleaner and crisper with 16 times more vertical resolution than traditional 8-bit instruments. Waveform details which were previously difficult to see can now be easily distinguished and measured. The HDO4000 oscilloscopes feature a sample rate of 2.5 GS/s with up to 25 Mpts/channel of memory (up to 50 Mpts/ch when interleaved) in two- and four-channel models from 200 MHz to 1 GHz. The HDO6000 oscilloscopes available in four-channel models deliver sample rates of 2.5 GS/s; a maximum 250-Mpts/channel memory, and bandwidths of 350 MHz, 500 MHz, and 1 GHz. All HDO models have a 12.1” touch display that gives users an easy means of controlling channels, trigger settings, and math and measurement functions.

These tools include WaveScan search and find, history mode waveform playback, sequence acquisition mode, and LabNotebook report generation. Spectrum-analysis and power-measurement software packages extend the oscilloscopes’ capabilities while leveraging their 12-bit architecture with its wider dynamic range and improved measurement precision.

In addition to HD4096 technology, the HDO features Teledyne LeCroy’s ERES (Enhanced Resolution) filtering, which enables users to gain up to three additional bits of resolution for 15-bit vertical resolution.

Also available for the HDO are software packages that serve to sharpen the instruments’ focus on two key analysis areas that affect a broad range of design and debug tasks. The Spectrum Analyzer software converts the controls of an HDO into those of a spectrum analyzer. It enables users to adjust the frequency span, resolution bandwidth, and center frequency. Users can apply filters to input signals and watch the frequency signature change in real time. A unique peak search labels spectral components and presents frequency and level in a table. Users may touch any line to move to that peak. They can use the