5G at 60 GHz sets data rate record at 2 Gbps at 300 m, 4 Gbps at 100 m

December 06, 2016 // By Jean-Pierre Joosting
Keysight Technologies with the University of California San Diego have announced the longest bidirectional phased-array link in the 60 GHz band. At a link distance of 300 m, the 32-element array achieved a data rate of greater than 2 Gbps over all scan angles up to ±45 degrees.

Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m.

Key highlights of the system include the UC San Diego transmit/receive phased-array chips which feature a noise figure < 6 dB; 42 dBm equivalent isotropic radiated power (EIRP), and scans ±50 degrees with sidelobes < -14 dB (32-element antenna).

The entire phased array consumed 3 to 4 W of DC power in either its transmit (Tx) or receive (Rx) modes. This is due to the high-performance system-on-a-chip (SoC) designs UC San Diego created using the third-generation silicon germanium BiCMOS standard buried collector (SiGe BiCMOS SBC18H3) process from TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader.

Keysight hardware and software enabled rapid prototyping of the system, as well as link equalization and state-of-the-art performance measurements at 2 GHz modulation bandwidth. Central hardware elements were the M8195A arbitrary waveform generator, E8267D PSG vector signal generator and DSOS804A high-definition oscilloscope.


A team at the University of California San Diego is using this test setup to characterize the performance of its 32-element phased array at gigabit data rates over distances of 100 to 800 meters. Keysight hardware and software enabled rapid prototyping of the array as well as state-of-the-art performance measurements at 2 GHz modulation bandwidth for 5G communications. Photo courtesy of UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.