Apple Inc. claims over USD 2.5 billion in damages from Samsung Electronics in patent lawsuit

July 25, 2012 // By Electronics EETimes
According to recent reports from the Wall Street Journal, Apple Inc. made claims that it deserves more than USD 2.5 billion in damages from Samsung Electronics who alledgedly reaped billions of dollars in profits and caused Apple to lose hundreds of millions of dollars through its violation of Apple's intellectual property.

In the 57-page brief, Apple said Samsung should pay USD 2.525 billion, with the bulk of the figure, USD 2 billion, representing the amount of total profits Apple calculates Samsung made with products that it said infringed Apple's patents and designs.

The Wall Street Journal recalls that Samsung previously said that Apple's claims "lack merit" and are "unfounded." And in its own 22-page court filing, made early Tuesday, Samsung's lawyers called Apple's damages request "absurd." Apple, according to Samsung's brief, "seeks to collect 'lost profits' despite the fact that no one buys phones because they have 'bounce back' features or other manifestations of Apple's alleged inventions asserted in this case."

According to Samsung, many of Apple's patents at issue in the lawsuit are invalid, partly because other companies beat Apple to the inventions.

The litigation between the two companies, which according to technology research firm IDC together captured about 52% of the world-wide smartphone shipments in the first quarter of the year, is a significant part of a broader global intellectual-property war between Apple and the makers of smartphones powered by Android, the mobile operating system owned by Google Inc.

Regardless of who wins, some patent experts think the outcome of the Apple-Samsung trial could cause companies to start settlement talks.

Apple's pretrial brief reiterated many themes the company has previously pressed, including that a variety of Samsung's smartphone and tablet computers ripped off Apple's designs. Apple also accuses Samsung of infringing a number of patents covering iPhone and iPad functions.

"Samsung's documents show that the similarity of Samsung's products is no accident or, as Samsung would have it, a 'natural evolution,'" reads the brief. "Rather, it results from Samsung's deliberate plan to free-ride on the iPhone's and iPad's extraordinary success by copying their iconic designs and intuitive user interface." According to the brief, Apple will attempt to prove its case partly by using internal Samsung documents, "which tell an