Dazzle-free high beam under camera control

March 21, 2016 // By Christoph Hammerschmidt
Ford Motor Company has developed a technology that helps to improve the safety of oncoming driver in the night: A camera, located behind the windscreen, identifies oncoming traffic and automatically switches the headlight to low beam. It also recognises rear lights of cars and bikes – at distances up to 800 metres (half a mile).

Studies have shown that the high beam in automated headlights are used up to ten times more frequently than headlights with manual control. Since high beam is unnecessary if it is not used, Ford has developed a new headlight technology that enables drivers to utilise the high beam on dark roads without the need to switch to low beam manually. A windscreen-mounted camera identifies the headlights of oncoming vehicles as well as the rear lights of cars and bikes and moves a cover to the headlight’s projecting lens that shades the respective sector in the cone of light. The result: No more dazzling.

 

The dazzle-free high beam is available for the new Ford models S-Max, Galaxy and Edge as a feature of the carmaker’s adaptive LED headlights whose light beams automatically adapt brightness and beam angle to the vehicle’s situation. The beam automatically follows curves and intersections and thus improves sight and safety during night rides. In addition to moving a cover to certain beam segments, the headlights also modify their light field according to the speed and thus ensure optimal illumination in all driving situations, Ford advertises.

 

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