E-car with exotic powertrain enters near-series stadium

February 10, 2016 // By Christoph Hammerschmidt
At the upcoming Geneva Motor Show, Liechtenstein-based engineering company Nanoflowcell will showcase a near-series version of its Quantino electric vehicle. The two-seater has a rather exotic way of storing the electric energy: The proprietary Flow Cell technology that stores the electric energy by means of electrolytes.

According to Nanoflowcell, in Geneva the Quantino roadster will be on display aside the larger model Quant E and Quant F Evolution, the latter twos being labeled as “sports stedan”. All feature the same way of storing electric energy in an electrolytic solution hitherto kept secretly by Nanoflowcell, but supposedly the vehicles feature a driving range of up to 1000 kilometres. In an implementation of the redox flow principle, an electrolytic liquid is stored in a tank inside the vehicle; after it delivered its electric charge it is pumped to another tank; at the next filling stop the exhausted liquid is pumped off.

The Quantino runs on 48V, a remarkably low voltage for an electric car – today’s conventional battery electric vehicles typically run with battery voltages of several hundred volts. Introduced as a concept car in 2015, the Quantino features 80 kW / 109 hp, distributed across four electric motors.

When it was first announced a year ago, scepticism prevailed in in professional circles for several reasons – for several reasons: The energy storage principle is widely unknown, because Nanoflowcell keeps it secretly. Likewise, the industrial and engineering capabilities of the outsider company are impossible to judge. Nanoflowcell CTO Nunzio La Vecchia, nourished the scepticism in that he (to my knowledge, until today), did not admit any independent tests of his vehicles.

In any case, the Quantino now has a street licence. After further pre-series tests, the company will decide if a small series of the vehicle will be manufactured.

More information: http://nanoflowcell.com

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