Holographic smartphone created in China wins 2015 CES Innovations Award

January 05, 2015 // By Jean-Pierre Joosting
Created in China, the takee1 holographic smartphone, the brainchild of Estar Technology Group Co., Ltd., has won the 2015 CES Innovations Award. The honor reflects the international recognition of the world's first "holographic smartphone" and is a testament to Chinese innovation capabilities in the smartphone market.

The CES innovation award review process is a very strict one, with the products that are submitted judged by a preeminent panel of independent industrial designers, independent engineers and members of the trade media who seek to identify outstanding design and engineering in cutting edge consumer electronics products.

With the holographic display, air touch and eye-tracking technologies, the takee1 smartphone claims to be the world's first mobile device to integrate smart holographic technology.

An industry expert said, "The biggest difference between the holographic display technology and legacy naked-eye 3D displays is that you can watch 3D content directly without the need for any intermediary tools or holography that can bring on dizziness for some viewers; secondly, with the holographic technology, viewers can watch all form of 3D content from different perspectives and positions, truly providing a sense of really 'being there'. This is something that traditional 3D technology has failed to achieve."

While both the design and the basic configuration of the smartphone are guaranteed at a "flagship product" level, the smartphone sends a different stereoscopic display effect to each eye with its 5.5" holographic screen.

The takee1 has a built-in holographic data platform-the Cloud Cube. The user can enjoy rich 3D videos, pictures, and games by logging on to the data platform.

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